How We Haiku — Teaching Stories 11

 

It’s one thing to appreciate haiku, but it’s a totally different animal to teach it.  Teaching requires flexibility, passion, and a degree of mastery of the subject that allows the teacher to converse freely and energetically enough to engage the audience in a learning moment… wherever and whenever that teaching moment occurs.

Check out this inspiring Teaching Story – How We Haiku.

Source: How We Haiku — Teaching Stories 11

100 Books Every Man Should Read | The Art of Manliness

One of the earliest articles we published on the Art of Manliness was “100 Must-Read Books for Men.” The piece was a result of a collaboration between the AoM team and a few guest writers. The list was certainly decent enough, but some of the guest picks weren’t books we would personally recommend. So too, over […]

Source: 100 Books Every Man Should Read | The Art of Manliness

What’s the fastest way to alphabetize your bookshelf? – Chand John | TED-Ed

You work at the library. You’re in the middle of a quiet afternoon when suddenly, a shipment of 1,280 books arrives. The books are in a straight line, but they’re all out of order, and the automatic sorting system is broken. How can you sort the books quickly? Chand John shows how, shedding light on how algorithms help librarians and search engines speedily sort information.

Source: What’s the fastest way to alphabetize your bookshelf? – Chand John | TED-Ed

C. S. Lewis Reviews The Hobbit

What a treat to find this authentic review of one of my favorites, The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien, written by the equally as favored author C.S. Lewis.  Reviewed in the same year The Hobbit was published, Lewis’ poignant reflection on Tolkien’s first novel introducing the characters and story of his later published work The Lord of the Rings trilogy hints at the profundity of the work.

A world for children: J. R. R. Tolkien, The Hobbit: or There and Back Again (London: Allen and Unwin, 1937) The publishers claim that The Hobbit, though very unlike Alice, resembles it in being the work of a professor at play. A more important truth is that both belong to a very small class of… Read More »

Source: C. S. Lewis Reviews The Hobbit